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Esoterica

Esoterica

  • By Dan Pound
  • Release 10/03/2009
  • Music Genre New Age
  • Media Format CD
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Price: $19.35

Product Notes

'I'm actually surprised that Dan Pound isn't found on any notable ambient labels that can provide better distribution for his self-released works. Dan Pound is a notable ambient talent.' Matt Rowe for MusicTap, May 2009 Traversing deep and wide into uncharted sonic territory, Dan Pound emerges with a whole new set of tracks that are un-classifiable by genre. Combining shamanic/ethnic percussion, voice and indigenous instruments with ambient electronic, space soundworlds, there is an expansive journey of discovery ready to be had throughout this whole disc. One is called out to the far reaches of the Nether worlds, and upon listening, one can't help but to heed it's call. Some moods are serene and tranquil, while others are mysterious, haunting or otherwise moody and atmospheric. As well there are sonic portraits that beget feelings of triumph, glory, and even ecstasy. Dan says: 'This set of music was created as if in a live setting, all of the pieces dynamically differing, yet all flowing together as if chapters in a book, telling a story. This music was intended to be listened to, also, as if it is being heard live. For that reason, turn it up. Feel it in your bones!' ESOTERIC- es-o-ter-ic, adj. 1. understood by or meant for only a select few. 2. private or secret. Electoambient Space review: Esoterica is another set of first-rate serene shifting soundscapes from Dan Pound. As on prior albums, Pound uses analog and digital synths and samplers, voice, flute, and didgeridoo. He melds them into a thoroughly pleasant array of moods and sounds. Divided into eight parts, each one floats calmly by with influences ranging from Tangerine Dream to Brian Eno, often all within the same track. For example, 'Esoterica Part One' starts with smooth floating music for a few minutes, but segues into a bright sequencer-based passage for the remainder. I particularly like part two, with a fascinating echoing bass line with quirky percussion running parallel to it. It defies easy categorization or description, but suffice to say it is a refreshingly unique take on electronic ambient music. The beat gets heavier and more tribal, ably aided by Pound's Lakota flute playing. By now over 20 minutes of excellent ambience has passed, with still more to come. Part three has a brisk, bright sequence and a sweeping synth that rises and falls. Then this fantastic chugging bass line takes over, although the energy remains restrained just so. Instead of continuing to build on this, Pound teases and then brings it back down, creating this wonderful dynamic. Part four has a stuttering little rhythmic bit, a hint of glitchy electronica but smoother than that. We're now well over 40 minutes in and it just keeps getting better. The energy goes up a notch on parts five and six, the latter featuring this cool clipped processed didgeridoo sound. The latter sections of the album with their clean, crisp, computerized percussion remind me of Vir Unis and James Johnson on their excellent Perimeter series, or Vir's solo album Mercury and Plastic. After all this fun with rhythm, the floating tones of part eight bring the disc to a relaxed finish. Esoterica is easily one of the best ambient releases of 2009 so far. © 2009 Phil Derby / Electroambient Space.

Details

Artist: Dan Pound
Title: Esoterica
Genre: New Age
Release Date: 10/03/2009
Label: CD Baby
Media Format: CD
UPC: 718122348497

Credits