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Halfway to Everywhere

Halfway to Everywhere

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Price: $24.39

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From Grandpa I got my storytelling. His visits were rare, as he and grandma lived in St. Catherines Ontario, and we lived just outside Calgary, Alberta. They spoiled all 8 of us children (according to my dad) but the biggest gift Grandpa always gave us was to tell us bedtime stories of the 'olden days'. Grandpa's stories usually involved exciting stuff like runaway teams of horses, shooting at wolves, or somebody getting body parts torn off. His tales were filled with gestures and sound effects. He really had a way of bringing them to life. And he listened when a kid told him a story. He made you feel your stories were important. From Mom and Dad I got music. My Dad and my other Grandpa were both musicians. Grandpa Hubele (of whom I knew very little) was a very good organ player. My dad played fiddle in his early years, touring around southern Alberta with a country dance band. He and Mom would, very occasionally, play duets on fiddle and piano when we were little kids. I can remember waiting til my parents went out. Since I was the oldest, I often babysat my brothers and sisters. I would sneak into Dad's fiddle case to take out the fiddle and play it. Except I was always trying to make it sound like a guitar, and I played it like one. We moved back and forth across the country, from Ontario to Alberta and back many times as I grew up. Dad kept trading up for jobs, and I was in a new school almost every year. I became a loner and a rebel. (I turned to humor to make up for my small size. I'd find the biggest kid in class, figure out how to make him laugh, and I didn't have to worry about the rest of the bullies. It pays to have friends in high places.) I believe I had an undiagnosed hearing problem caused by a trauma (now confirmed as a severe hearing loss). I never could quite understand the lyrics on the radio which was always on in our house, so I made up my own. My earliest memories were of crossing the big empty fields which made up the neighborhoods of my youth, singing at the top of my lungs and making up words as I went along. My mom says she could pick me out of the flocks of kids coming home from school. I'd be waving my arms and singing to myself as I walked across the prairie. I started writing songs in a serious way when I was 21 years old. A friend, who had been showing me how to play guitar, and I went out to live on the beach on Vancouver Island at Pacific Rim Park. I was picking away when a simple line kept repeating itself in my head. I wrote it down, and in ten minutes I had a song. It seemed to open flood gates, and for the next 2 or 3 years I wrote a song or two a week. I average about a song a month now. But, they are better songs. To write successfully, I usually have to be alone, have all my chores done and time on my hands. Words and melody most often develop at the same time. It takes from 10 minutes to 1 hour to write a song. It takes me two weeks to learn it. I like to wrap a song around a good story line. They always come from my own experiences. I was fascinated with the blues from the get-go. I came in through the back door. J.J. Cale, then Hot Tuna. Then B.B. King, Freddy King, and Muddy Waters. When I heard Bonnie Raitt play slide guitar, I was gone. I had to learn how to do that. I followed her trail back to Mississippi Fred McDowell. 'You want rock, you gonna have to put me in a rockin' chair. I plays the straight and natural blues.' I also paid attention to the songwriters, my favorites being Paul Simon, Harry Nillson and Tom Waits. My interest in jazz developed through my association with other musicians like Calgary's Chuck Tracy, a gruff, funny, kind of crazy lounge musician. He introduced me to Tom Waits, Mose Allison, and Fats Waller amongst others. As well, it became a habit to listen to the great Alberta radio station CKUA on Saturdays. Bill Coull's Jazz Show was a fifteen year course in 'Everything you should know about Jazz'. I also have a life-long addiciton to comedy movies and comic books. One of my Dad's jobs was as a projectionist in a small town. Once a week on Saturday night the local community hall was turned into a theatre. I was very young (3 years til 7 years old) but those old black and white 16mm movies of the Marx Bros, Chaplin, and W.C. Fields remain deep in my psyche. I think this was a great influence on my writing. Most of my songs have a little humor and a strange twist to them. My Uncle Bill, a policeman, was an inveterate comic book reader. Once he read them, he would save them up, and every once in a while he would ship a big cardboard box of them to us. It was better than Christmas! I rekindled my love for comics after I started raising my own kids. I now have quite an extensive collection of 'Silver Age' science-fiction comics. These are also an inspiration to me. I have worked as a laborer and heavy equipment ooperator and truck driver since leaving the University of Calgary after 4 years of unrelated courses and wandering interests. Previous to that, I had worked at the CPR as a ticket clerk. I began working at age 14 at the steel mill where my father worked. I did not graduate from high school. I have written songs for 32 years, writing approximately 2000 songs. Recording began for me in 1978 with the Acme Sausage Company with Holger Petersen broadcast on CKUA. Since then, I have been on countless radio and tv programs. I have recorded 6 albums of original material, and I am about to record my 7th, and most exciting, CD in March of 2004.BIOGRAPHY From Grandpa I got my storytelling. His visits were rare, as he and grandma lived in St. Catherines Ontario, and we lived just outside Calgary, Alberta. They spoiled all 8 of us children (according to my dad) but the biggest gift Grandpa always gave us was to tell us bedtime stories of the 'olden days'. Grandpa's stories usually involved exciting stuff like runaway teams of horses, shooting at wolves, or somebody getting body parts torn off. His tales were filled with gestures and sound effects. He really had a way of bringing them to life. And he listened when a kid told him a story. He made you feel your stories were important. From Mom and Dad I got music. My Dad and my other Grandpa were both musicians. Grandpa Hubele (of whom I knew very little) was a very good organ player. My dad played fiddle in his early years, touring around southern Alberta with a country dance band. He and Mom would, very occasionally, play duets on fiddle and piano when we were little kids. I can remember waiting til my parents went out. Since I was the oldest, I often babysat my brothers and sisters. I would sneak into Dad's fiddle case to take out the fiddle and play it. Except I was always trying to make it sound like a guitar, and I played it like one. We moved back and forth across the country, from Ontario to Alberta and back many times as I grew up. Dad kept trading up for jobs, and I was in a new school almost every year. I became a loner and a rebel. (I turned to humor to make up for my small size. I'd find the biggest kid in class, figure out how to make him laugh, and I didn't have to worry about the rest of the bullies. It pays to have friends in high places.) I believe I had an undiagnosed hearing problem caused by a trauma (now confirmed as a severe hearing loss). I never could quite understand the lyrics on the radio which was always on in our house, so I made up my own. My earliest memories were of crossing the big empty fields which made up the neighborhoods of my youth, singing at the top of my lungs and making up words as I went along. My mom says she could pick me out of the flocks of kids coming home from school. I'd be waving my arms and singing to myself as I walked across the prairie. I started writing songs in a serious way when I was 21 years old. A friend, who had been showing me how to play guitar, and I went out to live on the beach on Vancouver Island at Pacific Rim Park. I was picking away when a simple line kept repeating itself in my head. I wrote it down, and in ten minutes I had a song. It seemed to open flood gates, and for the next 2 or 3 years I wrote a song or two a week. I average about a song a month now. But, they are better songs. To write successfully, I usually have to be alone, have all my chores done and time on my hands. Words and melody most often develop at the same time. It takes from 10 minutes to 1 hour to write a song. It takes me two weeks to learn it. I like to wrap a song around a good story line. They always come from my own experiences. I was fascinated with the blues from the get-go. I came in through the back door. J.J. Cale, then Hot Tuna. Then B.B. King, Freddy King, and Muddy Waters. When I heard Bonnie Raitt play slide guitar, I was gone. I had to learn how to do that. I followed her trail back to Mississippi Fred McDowell. 'You want rock, you gonna have to put me in a rockin' chair. I plays the straight and natural blues.' I also paid attention to the songwriters, my favorites being Paul Simon, Harry Nillson and Tom Waits. My interest in jazz developed through my association with other musicians like Calgary's Chuck Tracy, a gruff, funny, kind of crazy lounge musician. He introduced me to Tom Waits, Mose Allison, and Fats Waller amongst others. As well, it became a habit to listen to the great Alberta radio station CKUA on Saturdays. Bill Coull's Jazz Show was a fifteen year course in 'Everything you should know about Jazz'. I also have a life-long addiciton to comedy movies and comic books. One of my Dad's jobs was as a projectionist in a small town. Once a week on Saturday night the local community hall was turned into a theatre. I was very young (3 years til 7 years old) but those old black and white 16mm movies of the Marx Bros, Chaplin, and W.C. Fields remain deep in my psyche. I think this was a great influence on my writing. Most of my songs have a little humor and a strange twist to them. My Uncle Bill, a policeman, was an inveterate comic book reader. Once he read them, he would save them up, and every once in a while he would ship a big cardboard box of them to us. It was better than Christmas! I rekindled my love for comics after I started raising my own kids. I now have quite an extensive collection of 'Silver Age' science-fiction comics. These are also an inspiration to me. I have worked as a laborer and heavy equipment ooperator and truck driver since leaving the University of Calgary after 4 years of unrelated courses and wandering interests. Previous to that, I had worked at the CPR as a ticket clerk. I began working at age 14 at the steel mill where my father worked. I did not graduate from high school. I have written songs for 32 years, writing approximately 2000 songs. Recording began for me in 1978 with the Acme Sausage Company with Holger Petersen broadcast on CKUA. Since then, I have been on countless radio and tv programs. I have recorded 6 albums of original material, and I am about to record my 7th, and most exciting, CD in March of 2004.BIOGRAPHY From Grandpa I got my storytelling. His visits were rare, as he and grandma lived in St. Catherines Ontario, and we lived just outside Calgary, Alberta. They spoiled all 8 of us children (according to my dad) but the biggest gift Grandpa always gave us was to tell us bedtime stories of the 'olden days'. Grandpa's stories usually involved exciting stuff like runaway teams of horses, shooting at wolves, or somebody getting body parts torn off. His tales were filled with gestures and sound effects. He really had a way of bringing them to life. And he listened when a kid told him a story. He made you feel your stories were important. From Mom and Dad I got music. My Dad and my other Grandpa were both musicians. Grandpa Hubele (of whom I knew very little) was a very good organ player. My dad played fiddle in his early years, touring around southern Alberta with a country dance band. He and Mom would, very occasionally, play duets on fiddle and piano when we were little kids. I can remember waiting til my parents went out. Since I was the oldest, I often babysat my brothers and sisters. I would sneak into Dad's fiddle case to take out the fiddle and play it. Except I was always trying to make it sound like a guitar, and I played it like one. We moved back and forth across the country, from Ontario to Alberta and back many times as I grew up. Dad kept trading up for jobs, and I was in a new school almost every year. I became a loner and a rebel. (I turned to humor to make up for my small size. I'd find the biggest kid in class, figure out how to make him laugh, and I didn't have to worry about the rest of the bullies. It pays to have friends in high places.) I believe I had an undiagnosed hearing problem caused by a trauma (now confirmed as a severe hearing loss). I never could quite understand the lyrics on the radio which was always on in our house, so I made up my own. My earliest memories were of crossing the big empty fields which made up the neighborhoods of my youth, singing at the top of my lungs and making up words as I went along. My mom says she could pick me out of the flocks of kids coming home from school. I'd be waving my arms and singing to myself as I walked across the prairie. I started writing songs in a serious way when I was 21 years old. A friend, who had been showing me how to play guitar, and I went out to live on the beach on Vancouver Island at Pacific Rim Park. I was picking away when a simple line kept repeating itself in my head. I wrote it down, and in ten minutes I had a song. It seemed to open flood gates, and for the next 2 or 3 years I wrote a song or two a week. I average about a song a month now. But, they are better songs. To write successfully, I usually have to be alone, have all my chores done and time on my hands. Words and melody most often develop at the same time. It takes from 10 minutes to 1 hour to write a song. It takes me two weeks to learn it. I like to wrap a song around a good story line. They always come from my own experiences. I was fascinated with the blues from the get-go. I came in through the back door. J.J. Cale, then Hot Tuna. Then B.B. King, Freddy King, and Muddy Waters. When I heard Bonnie Raitt play slide guitar, I was gone. I had to learn how to do that. I followed her trail back to Mississippi Fred McDowell. 'You want rock, you gonna have to put me in a rockin' chair. I plays the straight and natural blues.' I also paid attention to the songwriters, my favorites being Paul Simon, Harry Nillson and Tom Waits. My interest in jazz developed through my association with other musicians like Calgary's Chuck Tracy, a gruff, funny, kind of crazy lounge musician. He introduced me to Tom Waits, Mose Allison, and Fats Waller amongst others. As well, it became a habit to listen to the great Alberta radio station CKUA on Saturdays. Bill Coull's Jazz Show was a fifteen year course in 'Everything you should know about Jazz'. I also have a life-long addiciton to comedy movies and comic books. One of my Dad's jobs was as a projectionist in a small town. Once a week on Saturday night the local community hall was turned into a theatre. I was very young (3 years til 7 years old) but those old black and white 16mm movies of the Marx Bros, Chaplin, and W.C. Fields remain deep in my psyche. I think this was a great influence on my writing. Most of my songs have a little humor and a strange twist to them. My Uncle Bill, a policeman, was an inveterate comic book reader. Once he read them, he would save them up, and every once in a while he would ship a big cardboard box of them to us. It was better than Christmas! I rekindled my love for comics after I started raising my own kids. I now have quite an extensive collection of 'Silver Age' science-fiction comics. These are also an inspiration to me. I have worked as a laborer and heavy equipment ooperator and truck driver since leaving the University of Calgary after 4 years of unrelated courses and wandering interests. Previous to that, I had worked at the CPR as a ticket clerk. I began working at age 14 at the steel mill where my father worked. I did not graduate from high school. I have written songs for 32 years, writing approximately 2000 songs. Recording began for me in 1978 with the Acme Sausage Company with Holger Petersen broadcast on CKUA. Since then, I have been on countless radio and tv programs. I have recorded 6 albums of original material, and I am about to record my 7th, and most exciting, CD in March of 2004. Robert Hubele Heavy rotation on Radio in Belgium & Holland Nashville Showcase, NEA Extravaganza, with Lucinda Williams and Rosie Flores Showcase @ 'Chicago's' in Toronto for the International Music Exposition NXNE.The original roots music of Robert Burton Hubele (rhymes with 'jubilee') is drenched with blues, country, jazz and folk influences.In his music, an artist's passion and a poet's sensitivity blend with Hubele's colorful blue-collar life to create a personal style uniquely his own. Hubele accompanies his music with true and often off beat humorous stories. His instruments are slide Dobro and guitar. He tours as a solo artist in support of his new CD,The Human Heart. The CD was recorded in concert in one magical evening in his hometown of Cocharane, Alberta. The recording is live off the floor, with no overdubs. Hubele was born and raised in Alberta, Canada. He was the oldest of eight children in an eccentric, artistic, blue-collar family. His burly muscles came from working in the steel mill from the age of 14. The depth in his voice came from yelling over the sound of the diesel engines. Hubele began writing songs and following his passion for the blues in his early 20s. For years, Hubele led a double life - working as a heavy equipment operator by day, and a musician by night. Many of his songs were written while driving an 18-wheeler. Hubele first performed his original music solo and later became the leader of a variety of original bands. Hubele has shared the stage with artists such as Lucinda Williams and the Blind Boys of Alabama. His songs have appeared on movie and television sountracks. He has been a guest performer on numerous television and radio shows. Hubele recently appeared in the motion picture Speaking of Sex, with Bill Murray and Catherine O'Hara. Hubele is'Jimmy Sparks, The Melodius Felon', a lounge singer from the wrong side of the tracks. Over the years of pursuing a life of music - sometimes with only sheer will on his side - Robert Burton Hubele has remained true to his own musical vision, a vision grounded in his colorful, blue-collar life and reflected in the grandeur of the Rocky Mountains. In his live performances, Robert has returned to his folk-roots as a solo singer / songwriter / storyteller. His intimate shows are shared with audiences who are touched by seeing elements from their own lives reflected in his music. Hubele cites favorite songwriters Fats Waller, Muddy Waters, ahnd Hank Williams as his musical inspiration. Comedians such as the Marx Bros. And The Smothers Bros. And his extensive comic book collection are also an influence. Hubele's geographic isolation on windswept Canadian prairies and the rich variety of music heard on the non-commercial CBC and CKUA radio stations also have contributed to his individual style. In his powerful concerts, Robert BurtonHubele's songs and stories of and about the human heart move, touch and inspire his audiences . HIGHLIGHTS Highlights since the album's release include: Concert tour of Holland with the support of The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade of Canada. Chosen for the MP3 compilation CD 'The Sexiest Songs On MP3. Playing stand-up double -bass in Scott Backula's(TV's Quantum Leap) back-up band for the CBS Christmas Movie-of-the-Week 'Papa's Angels' Robert winning the part of 'Jimmy Sparks, The Melodius Felon', playing his nickle-plated Dobro and singing, in scenes with BILL MURRAY & CATHERINE O'HARA, in the Major Motion Picture Release 'SPEAKING OF SEX, directed byJOHN McNAUGHTON, due for theatrical release in the spring of 2001. Robert's song Through The Wild Country in scenes from the Fox Family Network series 'HIGHER GROUND', Episode 17, 'Falling Up'. Special Guest of 'The Blind Boys of Alabama' on their Alberta tour. #1 album on CKUA, Alberta public radio. Airplay on more than 50 U.S. radio stations and on selected radio stations World-wide. (Americana/roots format) press, including Gavin and Music Row heavy rotation on satellite 'Dish CD', based in Seattle and available across the U.S., Heavy rotation on Radio in Belgium & Holland Nashville Showcase, NEA Extravaganza, with Lucinda Williams and Rosie Flores Showcase @ 'Chicago's' in Toronto for the International Music Exposition NXNE.

Details

Artist: Robert Burton Hubele
Title: Halfway to Everywhere
Genre: Blues
Release Date: 30/12/2003
Label: CD Baby
Media Format: CD
UPC: 623667200851
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