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Tuesday Girl

Tuesday Girl

  • By Sarah Stanley
  • Release 11/08/2009
  • Music Genre Rock
  • Media Format CD
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CD 
Price: $17.46

Product Notes

Americana UK: "...packed with lots of subtle accessible charm..." "...reminiscent of the hypnotic melancholy perfection that Ryan Adams achieved circa his '29' peak." Rarwriter: ..."Stanley's rich voice...is a pitch-perfect exercise in weary, hopeful coquettishness." "...letters from the front, beautifully conceived, orchestrated and delivered..." Country Music Report "...would have been perfect for the soundtrack for 'Kill Bill.' "...a strong record that can be enjoyed by anyone." Pasadena Weekly "Elegant melodic shapes and the underlying grit of Stanley's salty-sweet vocals boost the poignance and power..." No Depression "...sultry, quavering vocals convey emotion and sensuality." On September 5, 2009 RMC Records proudly released Sarah Stanley's third CD, "Tuesday Girl," produced and co-written by critically acclaimed artist Rich McCulley (The Mains, Grant Langston). McCully, who has been signed with Geffen Columbia Records and has had over a dozen of songs used in Feature Films and TV shows put together a band of talented musicians, including Jen Mandel, Tony Horkins (Grant Langston), Amy Farris (Dave Alvin, X), Kelly Stanley (Divebar), Dennis Hamm (Baby Face), Adam Marsland (Al Jardin), Adam Aarronson (We Are Scientists), Tommy Rickard (Michelle Shocked), Taras Prodaniuk (Lucinda Williams, Dwight Yoakum) and the late, great Duane Jarvis (Lucinda Williams, Frank Black). Several of songwriting duo Stanley and McCulley's songs have been featured on primetime TV, including ABC's Men in Trees ("Coffee in the Morning"), Molly Shannon's Lifetime movie, More of Me, (title song), and HBO's racy documentary show, Cathouse ("All About the Money"). When they were asked to write "Sack of Stones" for a Getty show about renaissance artist Taddeo Zuccaro, and began to write an original musical based on a Jane Austen classic, they had the beginnings of an album. Drawing from real life experience, the title song "Tuesday Girl" came about when Sarah found out that her boyfriend also had several other girlfriends. This twisty two-step sounds like Nancy Sinatra's lost contribution to a Spaghetti Western soundtrack. It's a spicy number best washed down with cold beer and a smoldering look from the bartender. "Bluebirds and Daffodils" features a shoegazing melody that twinkles like starlight on a summer night. It encapsulates Sarah's feelings when her boyfriend flakes on her birthday and sends a generic email card instead. On the serene, twangy lullaby "Wish," the lyrics delve deep into Rich's longing for an ex-girlfriend. From title song 'Tuesday Girl': If I have to wait 'til Tuesday to kiss you I hate to do it but you know that I'll miss you And I hesitate to give you permission But if Monday comes and you're missin' me Go get her, you'll see, she's not a lot like me Go get her, you'll see, she's not your Tuesday girl Americana UK LA-based Sarah Stanley's polished take on folky country pop, is packed with lots of subtle accessible charm. Her soft likeable tones and catchy melodies have already gotten her featured on primetime TV soundtracks stateside and her third long player 'Tuesday Girl' is a well-produced, confident effort that's bound to get her noticed. Mostly co-written with producer Rich McCulley, the pervading sonic template for 'Tuesday Girl' of brushed drums, acoustic guitar, and atmospheric electric guitar textures are perfect for Stanley's softly-delivered confessionals. The songwriting is sharp throughout ('Wish', the title track, and the very modern love song of 'Bluebirds & Daffodils' with it's talk of dissapointing emails and lovelorn text messages - 'I'm not one for real flowers anyway.' ), whilst the rockier edge of 'Sack of Stones' and 'When I Lose My Heart' sound like big radio-friendly pop hits in waiting. What shows Stanley off as a formidable performer though is 'The Night Love Was Born'. A beautiful lilting piano-driven waltz with an affectionate lyric that seems to straddle delight and regret expertly, it has a lovely jazzy quality that suits Stanley's subtle voice to perfection, and is mildly reminiscent of the hypnotic melancholy perfection that Ryan Adams achieved circa his '29' peak... Songs as well written and sympathetically performed as most of those on display here, already stand Sarah Stanley head and shoulders above many who plough the same furrow. Rarwriter ...album is a polished work that amply supports Stanley's rich voice, which is a pitch-perfect exercise in weary, hopeful coquettishness. She and McCulley have composed an album's worth of beautifully crafted melodies targeted at the Adult Contemporary market that play well to Sarah's playful way with phrasing, which ranges from lovely waterfalls of sweetened notes in her higher registers to crackling paper in her lower range. Sarah Stanley inhabits her songs in admirable ways, performing them rather than simply singing, and she is wonderful in this way...There are certain tracks that really leap from this CD, including the title track 'Tuesday Girl', 'Wish', with it's George Harrison-inspired slide guitar - a particularly impactful song, primarily for it's simple but haunting melody delivered over a heart-breaking bed of steady 4/4 'blue pop' that sounds like soundtrack material played over the closing credits of a movie that ended bittersweet -- and the wonderful 'Do You I Do'...Sarah Stanley comes across as someone who has been there -- in fact, is there. These are like letters from the front, beautifully conceived, orchestrated and delivered, and I think they are great. Country Music Report With an open mind and interested ear, I eagerly put in a new album by up and comer Sarah Stanley into the CD player with high hopes, yet little expectation. It is weird how the mind works when it comes to new music. Well, any doubts that I had to begin with went away very quickly as 'Tuesday Girl' kicked off with a unique sound that includes a guitar and some awesome percussion licks. The title track's unique sound is something you could expect to hear in a movie and would have been perfect for the soundtrack for 'Kill Bill.' Don't ask why, it just has a sound that would have fit the movie like a glove. When describing certain sounds and the interesting way a song can grab your attention, the one track that comes to mind off of this record is 'Sack Of Stones.' Sarah's voice almost has an angelic feel that displays total control of her range and ability to deliver a tune. The meaning of this track may mean something different to others, but to me it is about someone who has carried the weight of the world on their shoulders for too long and now they are using it to their advantage. They have turned these stones into lifelong lessons and learned from every mistake, which in return they are giving to everyone around them to help out in their hardships and tribulations. 'The Night Love Was Born' offers the listener something completely different than anything else on the album. Although this is not a Jazz album and there really isn't a particular aspect that would put it in the 'Diana Krall' category, yet for some reason that's the only thing that I can relate it to. Regardless, it is a good tune that deserves to be heard. Surprisingly enough, my personal favorite was the last track. 'When I Lose My Heart' is something you can listen to for any reason and Sarah is rockin' it the whole time. For those of you, who are always looking for something new, give 'Tuesday Girl' a listen. For an independent album, this is a strong record that can be enjoyed by anyone. Pasadena Weekly LA singer-songwriter Stanley transformed a whopping dose of romantic woe into grist for her pen, resulting in 11 smartly turned pop tunes, all but two co-written with producer/guitarist Rich McCulley. Happily, it's not a recipe for slit-your-wrist musical downers. Elegant melodic shapes and the underlying grit of Stanley's salty-sweet vocals boost the poignance and power of ballads like "Wish" and the title track... No Depression Sarah Stanley's third CD (the first I've heard from her) evidences minor folk and rock influences but mostly delivers mainstream pop, with rich production, lilting music and lyrics that focus on the ups and downs of love affairs. The L.A.-based Stanley, whose songs have been featured on primetime TV, is a capable performer whose sultry, quavering vocals convey emotion and sensuality. At their best, moreover, her songs (all of which she wrote or cowrote) find fresh ways to address old topics. Witness the melancholy "Bluebirds and Daffodils," which manages to weave a technology theme into a tale of lost love. Also noteworthy is the title cut (not to be confused with "When You're a Tuesday Girl" by the Tuesdays), about an unfaithful boyfriend...

Details

Artist: Sarah Stanley
Title: Tuesday Girl
Genre: Rock
Release Date: 11/08/2009
Label: CD Baby
Media Format: CD
UPC: 634479967634
This product is a special order

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